We have so much to be thankful for.  With Thanksgiving just around the corner, we wanted to let you know of our updated schedule for the Thanksgiving weekend: Thursday, November 22, Thanksgiving Day CLOSED Friday, November 23, Black Friday CLOSED Saturday, November 24 NO CLASSES (NO 8:30am Socialization, NO 9am or 10am Group Class. Demos will still be held as scheduled at 12 noon) Have a festive and safe Thanksgiving celebration!
Rather than punishing a dog for breaking the rules (which it may not even be aware of or understand), reward it for doing what you want it to do. All animals, including humans, learn faster and respond better with this method. So if your dog goes potty in the house, don’t rub its nose in it or swat it with a rolled up newspaper. The dog will have no idea what message you are trying to convey. Rather, reward the dog with over-the-top treats and praise when it goes to do its business outside in an appropriate place. The dog will associate going to the bathroom outside with a positive outcome, and will be eager to replicate those results the next time. If the dog still goes inside occasionally, just ignore it- eventually the behavior will be completely eradicated.
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Ideally you should give the command phrase once and then use your food to move the puppy into positions. Once the puppy has performed the task, add in verbal praise and an affectionate pat, which are known as secondary reinforcers (see below). If the puppy does not immediately obey on the first command, then you are likely proceeding a little too quickly. If you keep repeating the command, the puppy will learn that several repetitions are acceptable before it needs to obey. Keeping a leash attached can help to gain an immediate response if the puppy does not obey.
Professor Donaldson is positive and encouraging, reassuring you the whole time that training may not go perfectly. Some lectures may need to be reviewed and repeated as you learn how best your dog will learn. As a bonus, she also helped create the guidebook for this course, which will give you detailed training plans for all the behaviors once you’ve gone through the course.
Treat your shelter dog the same way you would a new puppy coming into your house. Assume he has never had any training. Even if he has had obedience training in the past, he may need a refresher after all he's been through. Your best bet is to expect that he knows nothing. This way you'll be pleasantly surprised if the dog already knows some basic commands or is already housebroken, but you won't be setting him up for failure with expectations that are too high. Be sure to train your new dog using positive reinforcement. Keep training sessions upbeat and low-stress.
It can be tempting when you bring home a new dog to be a little lax on the rules. Resist the temptation now so you can avoid problems later on. It's much easier to prevent a bad habit from starting than it is to break one. Not only that, but dogs, like children, like rules and structure. It makes them feel more secure to know exactly what is expected of them and exactly what happens if they don't follow the rules. It also keeps order in the household. If you have other pets who already know the rules, they can get quite stressed out by an unruly newcomer. Whatever you do, do NOT feel sorry for your poor little rescue dog. Nobody wants pity, dogs included. For your dog's best interest, put whatever sad past he may have had behind him and live in the current moment. He's with you now, happy and cared for; he has no need for pity.
10. Keep training fun! One of the most important things to remember when training your dog is to keep it fun! As long as you and your dog are happy, enjoying your time together, and making progress, you’re doing it right! If you find that your dog seems uninterested in training, think of creative ways to make it fun for him. Choose higher value rewards, like freeze-dried meaty treats instead of boring old biscuits or end training sessions with a fun game of fetch or a walk to the park. Make sure you’re having fun, too! Your dog will sense your level of excitement and feed off of it. A happy dog that’s having fun will not only learn faster, but will look forward to your next training session together, too.
At the Louisiana SPCA, our Training and Behavior team utilizes methods that are rooted in the sciences of animal learning and dog behavior to help you reach your behavior goals. From basic manners and advanced skills to fear and aggression, our trainers will help you build a positive, lasting relationship with your dog.  Email training@la-spca.org with any questions.  Check out our Training FAQ Page for more information on our training programs.
9. Train in a variety of environments. Because dogs don’t generalize well, it’s important to have training sessions in a variety of different environments. You may have mastered the sit cue in your living room, but find your dog baffled when you ask him to sit in the back yard. A great way to help your dog learn that your cues should be followed no matter where you’re at is to clip a treat pouch to your waist, a leash to your dog’s collar, and have a series of mini training sessions. Start indoors, head to another room of the house, walk into the back yard, then take a short walk around the neighborhood, taking time to stop and practice cues and commands in each location.

In general, those individuals employed as dog trainers are largely “self educated”. This means they have read extensively on behavior modification and dog ethology, attended seminars, workshops and conventions, and perhaps mentored with other trainers. There are some “dog training schools”. As a matter of policy, at this time the APDT cannot endorse any of the selected training programs that are available around the country. When you investigate a school, be sure to inquire about methods used.


Professor Donaldson is positive and encouraging, reassuring you the whole time that training may not go perfectly. Some lectures may need to be reviewed and repeated as you learn how best your dog will learn. As a bonus, she also helped create the guidebook for this course, which will give you detailed training plans for all the behaviors once you’ve gone through the course.
Handlers should leave their dogs on a sit stay to the end of the leash. Once at the end of the leash they should turn and face the dog, on your command, they should call the dog by saying the dog’s name and “come.” They can guide the dog with the leash so that the dog will come with straight and with speed, stopping to sit directly in front of them.
The most important concepts in dog training are positive reinforcement, repetition, and patience. You didn’t learn the alphabet in a day; it would be unfair to expect your dog to remember every command perfectly after only a few tries. End your training sessions before the dog starts getting bored or frustrated, and try again another time, and have fun! If you stay calm and positive, the dog will pick up on your attitude and learn faster.
Examine the difference between tricks and obedience. Explore why teaching tricks can be beneficial to your dog as you work through three types of trick training: non-transitive or simple actions, transitive, and behavior chains. By using the foundation of obedience training you've already established, you can teach old (and young) dogs new tricks. x

Our methods focus on creating a positive relationship between you and your dog to improve your dog's behavior and obedience. Our expertise is in understanding how a dog naturally thinks, learns and communicates and then using this to show you how to be your dog’s leader. Once this relationship is established, behavior change is a natural next step. Our techniques work with any age, any breed, any issue. You and your dog get one-on-one attention, an individualized plan to suit your family AND guaranteed support for the life of your dog.


Dogs, like their wolf ancestors, are used to working and living with a pack. Think of the pack like a small cohesive military unit. Dogs work better when they are consistently given rules and orders to abide. Training gives the dog an opportunity to learn what it should and should not do. It also helps the owner establish that his word is law, and that the dog would do well to obey its owner.

All dog lovers take puppies, rescues and strays home in the hopes of raising them to be obedient, reliable dogs. After all, who does not want a well-trained canine companion? Dog owners, especially first-time dog owners, often think that training a puppy to be well-mannered and socialized is easy. This assumption leads them to take the time, commitment and effort needed to train any dog.

This book specifically focuses on training and training exercises in a step-by-step manner. It contains fewer theories and philosophy, and instead includes more actual training techniques with dog training tips. The most popular current method of training is a method of positive reinforcement. The behavior is reinforced through food, kindness or praising. This method is excellent for training puppies. But the truth is that you cannot raise a dog without negative feedback. Nature is full of negative reinforcement, and parental canines use that to train their young in the wild. They do it because it is effective and it is how pups learn. On the other hand, you should not base your training on negative feedback alone. The most important guideline is to be consistent in your training and in your reinforcement. Don't let your bad day at work become a reason to over-stimulate your dog. If you are going to train a dog, this book will help guide you through the process. Inside you will learn Service dog training methods How to provide leash training How to train a dog to sit How to train a dog another 8 basic commands How guard dogs and rescue dogs are trained to ‘speak’ (dog barking) How to avoid mistakes in dog training
We love our dogs and we want to do right by them. While there are numerous benefits to owners in having a well-behaved, obedient dog, there are surprising benefits to the dog as well—one of which is the potential of a significant improvement in both the quality and length of your dog’s life. Good training is enriching, mentally stimulating, and gives them a sense of control over their environment. But how do we know which training path to take when there is so much conflicting advice? How do we make sure we’re not doing more harm than good?
Have the handlers down their dogs; then leave their dogs by saying “stay,” moving their hand in front of the dogs face and then walking away with the leg furthest from the dog to the end of the leash. They will then turn and face the dog. Try to keep the handlers from putting any tension on the leash as this may cause the dog to get up. If the dog does move, the handler should move quickly to tell the dog “no,” put them back into place and leave them again.
Step-by-step advice from a professional, for any aspiring dog trainer! What it’s really like to work with dogs – and their owners; can you make a living training dogs? How to get an education; building your confidence; setting up your business; advertising; group classes; in-home sessions; phone tips; safety tips; trainer etiquette; products and tools you should be aware of, and MUCH more.  Shop here.
The Dogington Post is proud to do for the dog world what other great online newspapers have done for the dog-eat-dog world. We will show you who's bark is worse than their bite, who is most likely to be leader of the pack and who is the next bitch headed for stardom! A parody, but paws a moment. Along with all the fun, you'll find valuable information, heartfelt inspiration and a community captivated by the love of dogs.
This first step of the stay will be done without leaving the dog. The handler will tell the dog “stay,” move their hand in a quick motion in front of the dogs face, and move out in front of the dog leaving with the leg furthest from the dog. The handler should be standing directly in front of the dog with little space between them. The handler should hold the leash directly above the dog without any slack (don’t choke the dog or pull too tight), then after a count of 10, the handler should walk all the way around the dog while keeping the leash tight; stop in the heeling position. After a count of 10, call exercise finish.
Once your dog can stay, you can gradually increase the distance. This is also true for the “sit.” The more solidly he learns it, the longer he can remain sitting. The key is to not expect too much, too soon. Training goals are achieved in increments, so you may need to slow down and focus on one thing at a time. To make sure the training “sticks,” sessions should be short and successful.
This is the best place! I took my puppy here for training classes and would do it again in a heart beat. The trainers are highly informed in training dogs, love every puppy, and are VERY approachable. I have recommended it to a handful of people with new puppies. They even answered questions for me months later. Top quality!!! You guys are perfect!
Taking part in a training class is also a smart way to socialize your dog. Meeting other dogs is as fun for your pet as spending time with other owners is for you. It also gives your dog the opportunity to learn how to interact with other animals in a positive way. Moreover, a weekly class is a smart way to establish a training schedule. If you know you will attend a class each Wednesday evening, for instance, you may be more likely to make time for those daily practice sessions that the trainer assigns as homework.
We just got our new Goldendoodle and had a great trainer from Andrea Arden help us with house training and jumping. We were at our wits end with the nipping and chewing too. The trainer calmed us down and let us know that all this behavior is normal and showed us so many great ways to get control of the situation. She was really understanding and patient. Additionally, she went out of her way to assist our family beyond just the lesson. I was so pleased to find out that she purchased toys and treats to bring the next time she came. The entire experience with Lisa and the other staff was a great one. Bernie and my whole family give the entire crew a thumb and paw up!
Every dog whether puppy or adult needs to be socialized. It helps them to be more accepting of new animals, people and places. The way that it is done is by gradually exposing the dog to new people, animals and experiences. You need to be near your pet when you do this, so you can stay in control. Your dog may have fears or phobias and it’s your job to put him at ease with these new encounters. Use a reassuring tone until your dog feels comfortable and talk to him. Let him know it’s alright. Exposure is the only way to socialize your dog. Use positive reinforcement to reward appropriate behaviors and firmness for negative behaviors including aggressive behaviors. Your dog will be more well adjusted if he is properly socialized. Some things that you can do to speed the process are to take your dog on regular walks where there are other animals and people, take hi to a dog par, enroll the dog in a doggie day care a few times a month or invite friends to come over and bring their dogs for a visit.

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Killing and eating: From an evolutionary standpoint, dogs don’t see a massive distinction between beginning to feed and an animal dying—once the prey is no longer fighting or fleeing, eating begins. Therefore, we often see dogs practice the application of a clean dispatch via pressure or the “grab and shake” with toys, ropes, or other items they find.
It’s recommended that you purchase an adjustable collar that remains solidly in place when fastened. Make sure that the collar fits your pet snugly so they can’t get out of it, but it must be loose enough for comfort. You should be able to fit two fingers between the material and your pet. Be certain to check the fit regularly if your pet is still growing.
Many owners wonder if they should enlist the help of a professional dog trainer. Enrolling in a training class with your dog is often a great way to begin the training process, but it’s important not to rely on the trainer to teach your dog. A trainer’s job is primarily to teach the owner how to train the animal. By learning how to train your dog yourself, you can take the training home with you and better connect with your pet.

Likewise, if you have a special place you’d like the dog to stay when she needs to be out of the way of household activities, take her there. This is where you can finally let her off-leash. That place can be where her bed is, or a spot in the corner of the living room where you want her to lie, or her crate. By letting her off the leash here, you are telling her, “This is yours.” Don’t be surprised if she immediately decides to settle down and ignore the family for a while. This doesn’t mean she hates her new home. It means that she has found her place in it.
4. Be consistent. Consistency is absolutely essential in training a well-behaved dog. Be clear and consistent in the rules you want your dog to follow and make sure everyone in the home follows those same rules. For example, if you don’t want your dog to beg at the dinner table, make sure no one in the home slips him food from their plate. Inconsistency is confusing for your dog.
Non-associative learning is a change in a response to a stimulus that does not involve associating the presented stimulus with another stimulus or event such as reward or punishment.[46] Habituation is non-associative learning. An example is where a dog that reacts excitedly to a door bell is subjected to repeated ringing without accompanying visitors, and stops reacting to the meaningless stimuli. It becomes habituated to the noise.[47] On the other side of habituation is sensitization. Some dogs' reactions to the stimuli become stronger instead of them habituating to the repeated stimuli or event.[48] Desensitization is the process of pairing positive experiences with an object, person, or situation that causes fear or anxiety.[49] Consistent exposure to the feared object in conjunction with rewards allows the animal to become less stressed, thereby becoming desensitized in the process. This type of training can be effective for dogs who are fearful of fireworks.[50]
WOW! Say it with me: Cesar who? Andrea Arden’s Katrina Krings is the true Dog Whisperer! I called her to work with my 4 month old Maltese who I was hopeless at training. After only a few sessions she literally transformed my dog, and then worked with me to make sure I could keep the training up on my own! Kartrina, I cannot thank you enough!!!!!!! Suki is happy and I was told by my vet that she is the most well behaved dog they have ever worked with. (To be clear, they called me at home to mention this because they were so impressed by her calm demeanor and pure obedience) Great job!!!!!!!!!!

No-pull harness	The no-pull harness is worn on the body of the animal. The no-pull harness differs significantly from the standard harness since it makes it harder for the dog to pull because it distributes energy over the dog's back and shoulders. Like the head collar, the no-pull harness does not teach the dog not to pull, it only makes it harder for the dog to pull.

When training is started at 7 to 8 weeks of age, use methods that rely on positive reinforcement and gentle teaching. Puppies have short attention spans, so training sessions should be brief, but should occur daily. Puppies can be taught to “sit,” “down,” and “stand” using a method called food-lure training. We use food treats to entice the dog to follow its nose into the proper positions for “sit,” “down,” “stand,” and “stay”.
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