Once your dog can stay in a sit for several seconds, you can begin adding distance. Place him in a sit and say “stay,” take one step back, then step back to the pup, give a treat, and your release word. Continue building in steps, keeping it easy enough that your dog can stay successful. Practice both facing him and walking away with your back turned (which is more realistic).
First, make sure your puppy is comfortable wearing a leash. This can feel strange at first, and some puppies may bite the leash. Give your puppy treats as you put the leash on each time. Then, stand next to your puppy with the leash in a loose loop and give him several treats in a row for standing or sitting next to your leg. Take one step forward and encourage him to follow by giving another treat as he catches up.
After your dog has mastered the come command, it’s time to teach him how to sit. This command is, after all, a prerequisite for many others. To train your dog to sit, simply hold a treat above his head and slowly move it back. Most dogs respond to this gesture by automatically moving into the sitting position. As soon as your dog starts to sit, say the word “sit” and offer the treat as a reward. Repeating this task many times will help reinforce the command. This command is especially useful in instilling good manners. For example, an obedient dog who sits on command won’t jump on visitors.
Choose your dog's name wisely and be respectful of it. Of course you'll want to pick a name for your new puppy or dog that you love, but for the purposes of training it also helps to consider a short name ending with a strong consonant. This allows you to say his name so that he can always hear it clearly. A strong ending (i.e. Jasper, Jack, Ginger) perks up puppy ears—especially when you place a strong emphasize at the end.
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Punishment is operationally defined as an event that lowers the probability of the behavior that it follows. It is not "punishment" in the common sense of the word,[40] and does not mean physical or psychological harm and most certainly does not mean abuse. Punishment simply involves the presentation of an undesired consequence (positive punishment) when the wrong behavior is performed, such as a snap of the leash, or the removal of a desired consequence (negative punishment) when the wrong behavior is performed, such as the trainer eating the cheese that would have been the reward.[41] A behavior that has previously been developed may cease if reinforcement stops; this is called extinction. A dog that paws its owner for attention will eventually stop if it no longer receives attention.[42]


If he's an older dog, he's probably used to his name; however, changing it isn't out of the question. If he's from a shelter, they may neglect to tell you that he has a temporary name assigned to him by staff. If he's from a breeder, he'll come to you with a long name, which you may want to shorten, or change. And if he's coming out of an abusive situation, a new name may represent a fresh start. But we're lucky: dogs are extremely adaptable. And soon enough, if you use it consistently, he will respond to his new name.

K-9 Basics is a dog training company based in Marlton NJ. We specialize and take pride in our ability to give our clients an obedient and well mannered pet with off-leash control, even when in the heaviest of distractions. Our training is unlimited and our clients should expect nothing less than an outstanding dog. You work at your own pace and are not limited in the number of training sessions you can attend. Through our personalized training program, you will gain a confident, obedient and well mannered dog. Your dog will simply learn to listen to your first command.

The most important concepts in dog training are positive reinforcement, repetition, and patience. You didn’t learn the alphabet in a day; it would be unfair to expect your dog to remember every command perfectly after only a few tries. End your training sessions before the dog starts getting bored or frustrated, and try again another time, and have fun! If you stay calm and positive, the dog will pick up on your attitude and learn faster.
Small pieces of food or a favored toy can be used to motivate your puppy to perform most tasks. Provided the reward is sufficiently appealing, the puppy can be prompted to give the desired response by showing the puppy the reward, giving a command, and moving the reward to get the desired response. For example, food held up over the puppy's nose and moved slowly backwards should get a 'sit' response; food drawn down to the floor should get a 'down' response; food brought back up should get a 'stand' response; food held out at a distance should get a 'come' response; and food held at your thigh as you walk should get the puppy to 'heel or 'follow'. By pairing a command phrase or word with each action, and giving the reward for each appropriate response, the puppy should soon learn the meaning of each command.
The Association of Professional Dog Trainers, APDT, is a professional organization of individual trainers who are committed to becoming better trainers through education. The APDT offers individual pet dog trainers a respected and concerted voice in the dog world. We continue to promote professional trainers in the veterinary profession and to increase public awareness of dog-friendly training techniques.
Examine the difference between tricks and obedience. Explore why teaching tricks can be beneficial to your dog as you work through three types of trick training: non-transitive or simple actions, transitive, and behavior chains. By using the foundation of obedience training you've already established, you can teach old (and young) dogs new tricks. x
You can also work on teaching your dog yourself. There are lots of resources available, but it can be difficult to determine which information is bad and which is good. If your dog has habits you'd like to break, don't give up on him. Teach him instead!  Consistency and persistency are key.  Be consistent with your verbal cues and hand motions - "sit" and "sit down" sound very different to a dog.  One word commands combined with a hand signal are best!  Be persistent with your training and set aside time to practice every day until (and even after) your dog reliably responds to your commands.
When you follow these basic tips for training your dog, you should see results fairly quickly. Keep in mind that every dog learns at their own pace, so don’t get discouraged if it seems to be taking awhile. If you are really worried about the pace your dog is learning at, go back through and check that you are following all 5 super tips. We are confident, that with time and patience, your dog will eventually figure out what kind of behavior you expect and successfully learn to follow your commands.
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