If your city requires dogs to be licensed, get this taken care of right away. Licenses can usually be purchased at the Vet's office. Even if your city does not require a license, it's a good idea to provide contact information on your dog's collar. If your pet is lost or stolen, microchipping is a good way to ensure his safe return. Collars can come off, but microchips are there to stay. Dogs adopted from Wags & Walks are microchipped prior to adoption - we will send you an email shortly after the adoption is complete to confirm your preferred contact information before transferring the microchip to your name.
Clicker training is a nickname given to a positive reinforcement training system based on operant conditioning. Clicker training can also be referred to as marker training. The system uses conditioned reinforcers which are able to be delivered more quickly and more precisely than primary reinforcers such as food. The term 'clicker' comes from a small metal cricket adapted from a child's toy that the trainer uses to precisely mark the desired behavior; however, some trainers use a whistle, a word, or even a light as the conditioned reinforcer.[60] The trainer delivers a primary reinforcer, such as a toy or treat, after the noise or signal.
Examine the difference between tricks and obedience. Explore why teaching tricks can be beneficial to your dog as you work through three types of trick training: non-transitive or simple actions, transitive, and behavior chains. By using the foundation of obedience training you've already established, you can teach old (and young) dogs new tricks. x

Likewise, if you have a special place you’d like the dog to stay when she needs to be out of the way of household activities, take her there. This is where you can finally let her off-leash. That place can be where her bed is, or a spot in the corner of the living room where you want her to lie, or her crate. By letting her off the leash here, you are telling her, “This is yours.” Don’t be surprised if she immediately decides to settle down and ignore the family for a while. This doesn’t mean she hates her new home. It means that she has found her place in it.
Likewise, if you have a special place you’d like the dog to stay when she needs to be out of the way of household activities, take her there. This is where you can finally let her off-leash. That place can be where her bed is, or a spot in the corner of the living room where you want her to lie, or her crate. By letting her off the leash here, you are telling her, “This is yours.” Don’t be surprised if she immediately decides to settle down and ignore the family for a while. This doesn’t mean she hates her new home. It means that she has found her place in it.
If your dog exhibits extreme fears or aggression that is beyond what you are capable of handling, all is not lost. You can find a qualified and recommended dog trainer to work with your pet and help them move beyond whatever is causing the problem. In many cases, fear is behind extreme behaviors and a professional trainer is skilled at identifying the likely cause of the problem, then working with your dog to modify the extreme behaviors.

As soon as your dog comes home with you – that very first day – you should begin training basic obedience commands like Come, Sit, Stay and Down. You might discover your dog can already follow basic commands. You might also find that you need to take it very slow, working on just one command a day or for a couple of days or weeks then moving on to another command. Repeating a command over and over won’t make your pooch listen any better. If you find he can’t speak any English, solicit the help of a ‘translator’ or positive dog trainer to help you communicate more effectively.
6. Don’t do too much, too soon. When training your dog, it’s important to set the stage for success. That means allowing your dog to learn and grow at a pace that’s comfortable and successful and taking your time to advance to tougher behaviors. In dog training, you’ll often hear the term, “the three D’s.” This refers to distance, duration, and distractions – all factors to consider when training your dog at an appropriate pace. Slowly increase your distance from your dog as he learns to respond to cues, slowly expect your dog to remain in position for longer duration, and gradually increase the number of distractions present during training, only advancing each of these factors once your dog has proven successful.
Ready for advanced obedience training and want ideas for what to do next?  Let’s look at one option:  Fenzi TEAM Titles (http://fenziteamtitles.com). TEAM stands for Training Excellence Assessment Modules, and is made up of 6 levels of video “tests” for foundation through advanced obedience training skills.  Levels 1 – 3 are Sport Foundation, and build… Read more »

It’s recommended that you purchase an adjustable collar that remains solidly in place when fastened. Make sure that the collar fits your pet snugly so they can’t get out of it, but it must be loose enough for comfort. You should be able to fit two fingers between the material and your pet. Be certain to check the fit regularly if your pet is still growing.


Ideally you should give the command phrase once and then use your food to move the puppy into positions. Once the puppy has performed the task, add in verbal praise and an affectionate pat, which are known as secondary reinforcers (see below). If the puppy does not immediately obey on the first command, then you are likely proceeding a little too quickly. If you keep repeating the command, the puppy will learn that several repetitions are acceptable before it needs to obey. Keeping a leash attached can help to gain an immediate response if the puppy does not obey.
The general principles of positive training are simple. Just like humans, dogs will repeat behaviors that they are rewarded for. Begin by choosing a behavior you want to encourage, such as sitting. Give the command, then watch carefully. When your dog does something close to what you asked for, quickly give her a reward. As she learns the command, you can shape her behavior by rewarding only a more accurate response. Your training coach can assist you and offer advice for tricky situations. 

Drop, or drop it, is the order that tells your dog to drop whatever he has in his mouth. When he has something in his mouth, tell him “drop it.” If he doesn’t gently remove it from his mouth continuing to issue the command. When he willingly begins to release the object, praise him and you can also offer him a reward. This one can take a lot of repetition, but it’s well worth the effort.
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Begin teaching your dog good manners a few days after he’s had a chance to settle into the household. Keep your training lessons short—about 10 to 15 minutes at each session. You can repeat the session later on in the same day, but each one should be brief. Plan to engage in several training sessions a day because no puppy learns to do something perfectly in only one take.
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