I am a first time dog owner and needed to control my new little fury friend. The staff here is second to none, the facilities are fantastic, and my little pup loves it! He’s obedient, calm, and receptive to the training. Andrea and Jo Anne really care about the dogs and take a lot of time to make sure the little fellas are on track. Highly recommended!
Person-to-person communication is key with trainers, but words matter only so far as they can be translated into action. “Any kind of woo-woo language, about ‘energy,’ ‘packs,’ ‘leadership;’ anything that sounds very non-concrete, where you come away thinking, ‘O.K., but what’s actually going to physically happen with my dog here?’; any attempt to obfuscate — that is a huge red flag,” Ms. Donaldson said.
We love our dogs and we want to do right by them. While there are numerous benefits to owners in having a well-behaved, obedient dog, there are surprising benefits to the dog as well—one of which is the potential of a significant improvement in both the quality and length of your dog’s life. Good training is enriching, mentally stimulating, and gives them a sense of control over their environment. But how do we know which training path to take when there is so much conflicting advice? How do we make sure we’re not doing more harm than good?

The concepts of "pack" and "dominance" in relation to dog training originated in the 1940s and were popularized by the Monks of New Skete in the 1970s. The model is based on a theory that "dogs are wolves" and since wolves live in hierarchical packs where an alpha male rules over everyone else, then humans must dominate dogs in order to modify their behavior.[68] However, recent studies have shown that wolves in the wild actually live in nuclear families where the father and mother are considered the pack leaders, and their offspring's status depends on their birth order which does not involve fighting to attain a higher rank, because the young wolves naturally follow their parents' lead.[69]
Crate - Crates make the adjustment period less stressful for you and your new fur-baby. The crate should be big enough for your dog to stand up, turn completely around and lie down comfortably in.  However, if the crate is too big your dog may have accidents in it, so pay attention to crate dimensions and the dog weight/height it is recommended for.
The term "observational learning" encompasses several closely related concepts: allelomimetic behavior or mimicking where, for example, puppies follow or copy others of their kind; social facilitation where the presence of another dog causes an increase in the intensity of a behavior; and local enhancement which includes pieces of social facilitation, mimicking, and trial-and-error learning, but is different from true observational learning in that the dog actively participates in the behavior in the presence of the other dog and/or other environmental cues.[53] Four necessary conditions for observational learning are: attention, retention, motivation, and production. That is, the dog must pay attention to the dog or person performing the modelled behavior; retain the information gathered about the behavior during the observation; be motivated to reproduce the behavior in a time and place removed from the original; and finally, produce the behavior, or some reasonable facsimile thereof.[53]

No-pull harness The no-pull harness is worn on the body of the animal. The no-pull harness differs significantly from the standard harness since it makes it harder for the dog to pull because it distributes energy over the dog's back and shoulders. Like the head collar, the no-pull harness does not teach the dog not to pull, it only makes it harder for the dog to pull.


Training a dog to sit, lie down, stay, and come when called make your job as a pet parent easier, but they can also make your dog’s life better and safer. Knowing these commands can help you protect your dog from dangerous situations, and in some cases, save his life. Once you’ve learned how to properly teach your dog, training will be a fun and useful activity for you both.
In the 1980s veterinarian and animal behaviourist Ian Dunbar discovered that despite evidence on the peak learning periods in animals, few dog trainers worked with puppies before they were six months old.[25] Dunbar founded Sirius Dog Training, the first off-leash training program specifically for puppies, which emphasizes the importance of teaching bite inhibition, sociality, and other basic household manners, to dogs under six months of age.[31] Dunbar has written numerous books, and is known for his international seminar presentations and award-winning videos on puppy and dog behavior and training.[32]
Stand a short distance away from your dog and say its name and “come!” in a happy, excited voice. As soon as the dog looks at you, toss it a treat. After several repetitions of this, wait until it takes a step towards you before you toss the treat. Slowly raise your standards until the dog must come all the way up to you to get the treat. Try standing farther away or in a different room. If the dog is interested in something else, like a toy, and ignores you, try a higher value treat with a pungent smell, such as wet cat food. This will grab the dog’s attention even at a distance.
Person-to-person communication is key with trainers, but words matter only so far as they can be translated into action. “Any kind of woo-woo language, about ‘energy,’ ‘packs,’ ‘leadership;’ anything that sounds very non-concrete, where you come away thinking, ‘O.K., but what’s actually going to physically happen with my dog here?’; any attempt to obfuscate — that is a huge red flag,” Ms. Donaldson said.
From there, start your schedule of feeding, toileting and play/exercise. From Day One, your dog will need family time and brief periods of solitary confinement. Don’t give in and comfort him if he whines when left alone. Instead, give him attention for good behavior, such as chewing on a toy or resting quietly (Source: Preparing Your Home For A New Dog).
“Down” can be taught very similarly to “sit.” You can wait for your dog to lie down (beginning in a boring, small room such as a bathroom can help) and capture the behavior by reinforcing your dog with a treat when he lies down, giving him his release cue to stand back up (and encouragement with a lure if needed) and then waiting for him to lie down again. When he is quickly lying down after standing up, you can begin saying “down” right before he does so.
To start training your dog to “settle,” leash her up and take a seat. Step on the leash so your dog has only enough room to sit, stand, and turn around, but not stray from your side. Then, wait. Your dog may be excited at first, and try to jump up on your lap or run around the room. Let her figure out that she can’t go anywhere. Once she settles down on her own, say “yes!” and give her a treat.
Ready for advanced obedience training and want ideas for what to do next?  Let’s look at one option:  Fenzi TEAM Titles (http://fenziteamtitles.com). TEAM stands for Training Excellence Assessment Modules, and is made up of 6 levels of video “tests” for foundation through advanced obedience training skills.  Levels 1 – 3 are Sport Foundation, and build… Read more »
Keep your dog’s training sessions short. Puppies have especially short attention spans, but all dogs need breaks so that they don’t get bored or distracted. Some puppies may only be able to focus on training for about five minutes at a time. Older dogs may last 15 or 20 minutes before becoming bored with the task at hand. A little playtime between training sessions is a great way to keep your dog focused and reward him for his hard work.

After discussing it with your veterinarian to ensure your dog has all the necessary vaccines, you may wish to take your dog to group training classes or the dog park. Pay close attention to your dog’s body language to be sure he’s having a good time — and is not fearful or a dog park bully. If you’re unsure of what signs to watch for, check out this video on safety at the dog park.
With dog training equipment from PetSmart, you'll be able to crate train your pup more easily. Our supplies and help with dog obedience and housetraining by rewarding him for good behavior. Teach him to love his crate and have good manners indoors and out. You'll be amazed at what your dog can do! Browse all of our dog training equipment and supplies.
In general, those individuals employed as dog trainers are largely “self educated”. This means they have read extensively on behavior modification and dog ethology, attended seminars, workshops and conventions, and perhaps mentored with other trainers. There are some “dog training schools”. As a matter of policy, at this time the APDT cannot endorse any of the selected training programs that are available around the country. When you investigate a school, be sure to inquire about methods used.
When you adopt a puppy or dog from a shelter, he comes with a history — not the least of which is being relinquished to the shelter. Keep in mind that the stress of this, along with whatever the dog has experienced in his past, can make him less than confident in new surroundings. Plan on giving him some time to adjust to his new home and family. Dogs can take anywhere from a few hours to several months to get used to living in a new place. During this adjustment time, do what you can to make your new dog feel safe and comfortable. Be patient while he adjusts, but also try to keep things consistent and predictable in his new environment.
…among others. So, before you even bring your puppy home, you need to do some research to figure out which dog training method you would like to use, and what commands you'll need to teach your puppy first. Then, once you’ve chosen how you want to train your dog, you will need to find a guide or manual to help you along the way. That's where the best dog training books come in!
All dog lovers take puppies, rescues and strays home in the hopes of raising them to be obedient, reliable dogs. After all, who does not want a well-trained canine companion? Dog owners, especially first-time dog owners, often think that training a puppy to be well-mannered and socialized is easy. This assumption leads them to take the time, commitment and effort needed to train any dog.
Stay is the second command to teach your dog. When he is in a sitting position, tell him “stay,” then walk a short distance. If he gets up, make him sit again and repeat the process, offering him a reward every time he obeys the command. Move further and further away each time until he stays when you are out of his sight. Be persistent and consistent until he understands the command and is willing to obey. The best hand gesture to use with this command is a flat hand turned upwards with fingers pointed up, held outwards towards the dog.
In addition, over the past year, we have had great success integrating remote collars into our training program. These collars use very low-level electrical impulses (usually lower than a human can feel in their own hand,) in conjunction with commands to reinforce understanding and bring your dog to on and off-leash reliability, while adjusting unwanted behavior in less time and with much less stress than ever before. 
This book specifically focuses on training and training exercises in a step-by-step manner. It contains fewer theories and philosophy, and instead includes more actual training techniques with dog training tips. The most popular current method of training is a method of positive reinforcement. The behavior is reinforced through food, kindness or praising. This method is excellent for training puppies. But the truth is that you cannot raise a dog without negative feedback. Nature is full of negative reinforcement, and parental canines use that to train their young in the wild. They do it because it is effective and it is how pups learn. On the other hand, you should not base your training on negative feedback alone. The most important guideline is to be consistent in your training and in your reinforcement. Don't let your bad day at work become a reason to over-stimulate your dog. If you are going to train a dog, this book will help guide you through the process. Inside you will learn Service dog training methods How to provide leash training How to train a dog to sit How to train a dog another 8 basic commands How guard dogs and rescue dogs are trained to ‘speak’ (dog barking) How to avoid mistakes in dog training
Small pieces of food or a favored toy can be used to motivate your puppy to perform most tasks. Provided the reward is sufficiently appealing, the puppy can be prompted to give the desired response by showing the puppy the reward, giving a command, and moving the reward to get the desired response. For example, food held up over the puppy's nose and moved slowly backwards should get a 'sit' response; food drawn down to the floor should get a 'down' response; food brought back up should get a 'stand' response; food held out at a distance should get a 'come' response; and food held at your thigh as you walk should get the puppy to 'heel or 'follow'. By pairing a command phrase or word with each action, and giving the reward for each appropriate response, the puppy should soon learn the meaning of each command.
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