Likewise, if you have a special place you’d like the dog to stay when she needs to be out of the way of household activities, take her there. This is where you can finally let her off-leash. That place can be where her bed is, or a spot in the corner of the living room where you want her to lie, or her crate. By letting her off the leash here, you are telling her, “This is yours.” Don’t be surprised if she immediately decides to settle down and ignore the family for a while. This doesn’t mean she hates her new home. It means that she has found her place in it.

This book specifically focuses on training and training exercises in a step-by-step manner. It contains fewer theories and philosophy, and instead includes more actual training techniques with dog training tips. The most popular current method of training is a method of positive reinforcement. The behavior is reinforced through food, kindness or praising. This method is excellent for training puppies. But the truth is that you cannot raise a dog without negative feedback. Nature is full of negative reinforcement, and parental canines use that to train their young in the wild. They do it because it is effective and it is how pups learn. On the other hand, you should not base your training on negative feedback alone. The most important guideline is to be consistent in your training and in your reinforcement. Don't let your bad day at work become a reason to over-stimulate your dog. If you are going to train a dog, this book will help guide you through the process. Inside you will learn Service dog training methods How to provide leash training How to train a dog to sit How to train a dog another 8 basic commands How guard dogs and rescue dogs are trained to ‘speak’ (dog barking) How to avoid mistakes in dog training
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Stay is the second command to teach your dog. When he is in a sitting position, tell him “stay,” then walk a short distance. If he gets up, make him sit again and repeat the process, offering him a reward every time he obeys the command. Move further and further away each time until he stays when you are out of his sight. Be persistent and consistent until he understands the command and is willing to obey. The best hand gesture to use with this command is a flat hand turned upwards with fingers pointed up, held outwards towards the dog.

The Monks of New Skete, who were breeders and trainers of German Shepherds in Cambridge, New York, published How to Be Your Dog's Best Friend: A Training Manual for Dog Owners in 1978 and it became an immediate best seller. Despite advocating a philosophy that "understanding is the key to communication and compassion with your dog,"[29] they endorsed confrontational punishments which were later shown to elicit dangerously aggressive responses in many dogs.[30]
It can be tempting when you bring home a new dog to be a little lax on the rules. Resist the temptation now so you can avoid problems later on. It's much easier to prevent a bad habit from starting than it is to break one. Not only that, but dogs, like children, like rules and structure. It makes them feel more secure to know exactly what is expected of them and exactly what happens if they don't follow the rules. It also keeps order in the household. If you have other pets who already know the rules, they can get quite stressed out by an unruly newcomer. Whatever you do, do NOT feel sorry for your poor little rescue dog. Nobody wants pity, dogs included. For your dog's best interest, put whatever sad past he may have had behind him and live in the current moment. He's with you now, happy and cared for; he has no need for pity.
In the 1950s Blanche Saunders was a staunch advocate of pet-dog training, travelling throughout the U.S. to promote obedience classes.[15] In The Complete Book of Dog Obedience, she said, "Dogs learn by associating their act with a pleasing or displeasing result. They must be disciplined when they do wrong, but they must also be rewarded when they do right."[22] Negative reinforcement procedures played a key part in Saunders' method, primarily the jerking of the choke chain. The mantra taught to students was "Command! Jerk! Praise!" She felt that food should not be an ongoing reward, but that it was acceptable to use "a tidbit now and then to overcome a problem." Saunders perhaps began the shift away from military and police training methods, stressing repeatedly the importance of reinforcement for good behaviour in training—a move toward the positive training methods used today.[23]

Begin teaching your dog good manners a few days after he’s had a chance to settle into the household. Keep your training lessons short—about 10 to 15 minutes at each session. You can repeat the session later on in the same day, but each one should be brief. Plan to engage in several training sessions a day because no puppy learns to do something perfectly in only one take.
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